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Logan Adams
Logan Adams

Set Up Mac Proxy For Bluestacks



BlueStacks installations now includes a command-line utility HD-ConfigHttpProxy.exe to setup a proxy connection. I can't find documentation for this utility anywhere but it's pretty basic:




Set Up Mac Proxy For Bluestacks



Alternatively, you can specify other proxy protocols by including it in the in standard syntax. For example, I used socks://localhost and my custom port number. It took a couple tries but it worked eventually.


I found a solution. I used proxycap to redirect Bluestacks through proxy (even with LDAP). You have to download and install the application, set your proxy and create a new rule for HD-Network.exe (found under Bluestack directory in %Program_Files%). It worked for me.


I have being able to use BlueStacks on my network using cntlm + Proxifier. I use cntlm to authenticate on my proxy and Proxifier as a replacement for Proxycaps/WideCap. Proxifier lets you tunnel your socks connections through the cntlm proxy ( )


Actually you can use fiddler. You see, fiddler configures the winINET proxy to go through it (the one used by internet explorer and all other microsoft software, but sometimes even third pary software uses winINET proxy config - that is why some programs just magically work with fiddle). Some programs ignore wininet config completly and have their own method of setting a proxy (like firefox, chrome). And other programs, like bluestacks, have no support for proxy at all.


But you can force BlueStacks to go through the fiddler proxy. A tool which can do that, and which has a tutorial on this, is ProxyCap: use 127.0.0.1 as server and 8888 as port number in configuration of the proxies in proxycap. You must also add HD-Agent and HD-Frontend executables in the rules, as specified in the last part of the step-by-step guide.


Unfortunately, proxycap is a 30 day trial. You can use free proxifiers out there. Find something that supports http. _of_proxifiersI did manage to make this work with proxyCap myself and haven't tried anything else yet.


Today I tried Fiddler - ProxyCap - BlueStacks. It didn't work at first. After I added "HD-Plus-Service.exe" everything was Okay. It seems like new bluestacks versions don't use HD-Network.exe? Anyway my program list includes:


Simply put, a proxy server is a gateway between the client and the server. In our case, we will use the mobile device as a client, and make the computer act as a proxy between the client and the server. The flow is setup in a way that the internet traffic passes through the proxy server while attempting to reach the web address you requested.


For power users: If you know what a proxy is and how to set it up, enable the proxy on GFAlarm and connect your phone or emulator to its address, then launch GFL and it should connect to GFAlarm (you may need to do this twice, but not more than that). You can skip to the GFAlarm Explained section once you have it working. Otherwise, follow the step-by-step instructions below.


Emulators will usually persist the proxy server setup settings - so you should not need to re-configure it every time you boot up your emulator. However, please note that you will have to have the GFAlarm running while the proxy is enabled to use your emulator's Internet connection properly (since otherwise your phone will try to route through a nonexistent GFAlarm and the traffic won't go anywhere).


Note that as with the regular Android instructions, you do not have to redo the proxy every time the emulator is launched. Rather, users should remember to launch the GFAlarm program (or remove the Proxy settings) before trying to log in to the game.


You may occasionally wish to reset the proxy settings from issues that may arise during normal use. This can happen due to the emulator unexpectedly closing without proper shutdown or from other issues related to the emulator. To do this, you may enter the following command:


I've recently described the setup steps needed for Android real devices and emulators. There is a small difference when using emulators when setting the proxy address. For AVDs, the IP address that needs to e used is 10.0.2.2 (for real devices, it is usually something like 192.168.0.1), I've described the steps in detail for the new Fiddler Everywhere, but you can use them as reference for the classic FIddler as well. Gernymotion emulators are using another IP address usually 10.0.3.2.


Hi and thank you for your reply, with this I was able get things working with the emulator. It turned out I had two different problems. First is that the Fiddler setting "Decrypt HTTPS traffic" must be set to "... from all processes", I had it set to remote clients only. The second is about how you set up the proxy. When using Android Studio it's possible to set up which proxy to use from the emulator settings as well as inside Android. The emulator settings is very convenient, but this does not seem to work at all with Fiddler (it works fine with other proxies like Burp suite or mitmproxy).


If using Genymotion:* Set up the wifi to connect to the Fiddler proxy following the steps in the post linked by Nick.* Use either 10.0.3.2 or your ip on the local network (192.168.xxx.yyy), both worked fine for me.


* DO NOT use the proxy settings found under Settings -> Proxy in the emulator, this does not work with Fiddler for https traffic (http traffic works fine).* Inside Android, open Settings -> More... -> Cellular networks -> Access Point Names -> Press + to add a new name (or edit the default if possible)* Provide any value under Name and APN. Input your local network IP or 10.0.2.2 under Proxy and specify the fiddler port under port.* Tap the three dot meny and save.* Go back to the APN list and make sure your apn is selected (tap the radio button to select it)* Turn on flight mode and then disable it again to enable the new settings


I will add some of the KB article observations so that more users are aware that the proxy settings on the emulator should be made through the emulated Android OS (and not through the Android Studio settings or the AVD settings).


No. Although there are many free VPNs on the market, they are not really suitable for gaining privacy on your BlueStacks emulator. Free VPNs are often highly congested with free users located all over the world. To deal with this issue, those free VPNs often impose bandwidth limits and download restrictions. This makes those free VPNs very slow and makes them unsuitable if you want to use them regularly for tasks that require unlimited data, such as gaming or streaming.\nIn addition to suffering severe performance issues, free VPNs are impossible to recommend for gaining online privacy and security. Free VPNs often have invasive privacy policies that let them harvest user data and profit from it. To this end, they often profile users, create a profile of their web visits and online habits, and sell that data to marketing companies and data brokers.\nFurthermore, free VPNs have been found to have outdated apps, weak or no encryption, severe data leaks, vulnerabilities, and even apps that have been purposefully loaded with tracking libraries and spyware. This makes using free VPNs a threat to your device security and to your digital footprint. For this reason, we strongly urge you to reconsider using free VPNs in favor of trustworthy services that work to gain online privacy.\u00a0","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Ray Walsh","description":"Ray Walsh is a digital privacy expert with over 6 years of experience writing about consumer privacy services including VPNs, password managers, secure email services, and encrypted cloud backups.\nRay graduated from the English department of Exeter University in the UK and has since been quoted over 500 times to express his privacy advocacy opinions in leading publications such as The Times, The Guardian, The Washington Post, CNet, and The Register to name a few. Ray has also been interviewed on the TV and the radio, including on The BBC and Russia Today to answer questions regarding privacy laws and surveillance tech.\nRay has written tech guides, reviews, blogs, news, and opinion pieces for BestVPN, ProPrivacy, Dell Tech Page One, StartPage, and Politics.co.uk \u2013 and he is now a happy member of the Comparitech family where he continues his crusade to increase privacy and internet freedom for people around the world.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/ray-walsh\/"}},"@type":"Question","name":"Can I use a BlueStacks VPN to unblock restricted VoIP services?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"Yes. If you live in a country that restricts access to VoIP apps like WhatsApp, Zoom, and Skype, you can easily use a VPN to regain access to those apps in BlueStacks. A VPN allows you to sidestep any censorship imposed by ISPs on behalf of governments in countries like the UAE, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Pakistan.\u00a0\nThe best thing about a secure BlueStacks VPN is that it also encrypts your web traffic and handles your DNS requests. This prevents your ISP from being able to track what you do online. As a result, you can use VoIP services to make free calls in a completely private manner.\nThe great thing about the privacy provided by a VPN is that you never have to worry about local network administrators. ISPs, or government agencies figuring out that you unblocked VoIP serves that have been purposefully restricted to prevent people from communicating free of surveillance and free of charge.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Ray Walsh","description":"Ray Walsh is a digital privacy expert with over 6 years of experience writing about consumer privacy services including VPNs, password managers, secure email services, and encrypted cloud backups.\nRay graduated from the English department of Exeter University in the UK and has since been quoted over 500 times to express his privacy advocacy opinions in leading publications such as The Times, The Guardian, The Washington Post, CNet, and The Register to name a few. Ray has also been interviewed on the TV and the radio, including on The BBC and Russia Today to answer questions regarding privacy laws and surveillance tech.\nRay has written tech guides, reviews, blogs, news, and opinion pieces for BestVPN, ProPrivacy, Dell Tech Page One, StartPage, and Politics.co.uk \u2013 and he is now a happy member of the Comparitech family where he continues his crusade to increase privacy and internet freedom for people around the world.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/ray-walsh\/","@type":"Question","name":"Is it safe to use the BlueStacks Android emulator?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"Yes. Although older versions of BlueStacks were found to contain vulnerabilities that cybercriminals could exploit, the devs have already patched those issues in the more recent version of the application.\u00a0\nAs long as you stick to the most recent BlueStacks build (and no version older than BlueStacks 4.8) you will not be vulnerable to remote code execution attacks that previously allowed hackers to steal people\u2019s personal data.\u00a0\nIf you are a long-time BlueStacks user, we recommend that you check you aren\u2019t using an older version of BlueStacks, because this will still contain the IPC Mechanism flaw that allowed hackers to exploit users.\u00a0\nIn addition, we recommend that you always stick to using BlueStacks with the added protection of a VPN as this will vastly increase your privacy and security when you use the emulator both at home and when on public wifi.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Ray Walsh","description":"Ray Walsh is a digital privacy expert with over 6 years of experience writing about consumer privacy services including VPNs, password managers, secure email services, and encrypted cloud backups.\nRay graduated from the English department of Exeter University in the UK and has since been quoted over 500 times to express his privacy advocacy opinions in leading publications such as The Times, The Guardian, The Washington Post, CNet, and The Register to name a few. Ray has also been interviewed on the TV and the radio, including on The BBC and Russia Today to answer questions regarding privacy laws and surveillance tech.\nRay has written tech guides, reviews, blogs, news, and opinion pieces for BestVPN, ProPrivacy, Dell Tech Page One, StartPage, and Politics.co.uk \u2013 and he is now a happy member of the Comparitech family where he continues his crusade to increase privacy and internet freedom for people around the world.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/ray-walsh\/","@type":"Question","name":"Why do I need a VPN for BlueStacks?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"A Virtual Private Network is an online tool designed to provide subscribers with online privacy and data security. It works by encrypting your data to prevent any third parties from being able to snoop on your web traffic. This encrypted connection prevents local network administrators, public wifi hotspots, internet service providers, government agencies, and any other eavesdroppers from being able to monitor what you do online.\nA VPN also conceals your IP address from the websites you visit. This prevents those websites from knowing your location, and stops them from being able to easily track you each time you return to their site. As a result, of the location spoofing services provided by a VPN, netizens can get around local censorship, internet blocks, and geo-restrictions.\nThe benefits listed above allow anybody who uses BlueStacks to gain high levels of freedom and privacy online. This ensures that your data is not being harvested by third parties and disseminated around the internet causing you to be profiled. Your online habits and data reveal a lot about your personal preferences, and a BlueStacks VPN is an easy way to instantly improve your digital privacy.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Ray Walsh","description":"Ray Walsh is a digital privacy expert with over 6 years of experience writing about consumer privacy services including VPNs, password managers, secure email services, and encrypted cloud backups.\nRay graduated from the English department of Exeter University in the UK and has since been quoted over 500 times to express his privacy advocacy opinions in leading publications such as The Times, The Guardian, The Washington Post, CNet, and The Register to name a few. Ray has also been interviewed on the TV and the radio, including on The BBC and Russia Today to answer questions regarding privacy laws and surveillance tech.\nRay has written tech guides, reviews, blogs, news, and opinion pieces for BestVPN, ProPrivacy, Dell Tech Page One, StartPage, and Politics.co.uk \u2013 and he is now a happy member of the Comparitech family where he continues his crusade to increase privacy and internet freedom for people around the world.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/ray-walsh\/","@type":"Question","name":"Will a VPN make BlueStacks faster?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"Many of the 145 million people around the world who use BlueStacks use it to play games are interested in whether a VPN can speed up their BlueStacks. Unfortunately, a VPN must route your internet further and provide an additional layer of encryption.\u00a0\nThe vast majority of the time this will actually cause your internet to become slightly slower. A VPN also uses up more of your system\u2019s resources, which may also cause your computer to slow down. In combination, these things could cause BlueStacks to be slower rather than faster.\nSo why do people claim that a VPN can improve their ping or speed up their internet? In some places around the world, ISPs engage in bandwidth throttling to prevent congestion. To do so ISPs monitor what their users are doing, and those who do data-intensive tasks like gaming or streaming are usually the first to have their bandwidth throttled. This slows down your internet and makes it harder to play games.\nA VPN can prevent bandwidth throttling because it stops your ISP from being able to detect what you are doing online. This stops its automated systems from singling you out as a user who should be throttled. If you believe that you are being throttled when you play games or stream HD videos, we strongly suggest that you try a VPN.\u00a0","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Ray Walsh","description":"Ray Walsh is a digital privacy expert with over 6 years of experience writing about consumer privacy services including VPNs, password managers, secure email services, and encrypted cloud backups.\nRay graduated from the English department of Exeter University in the UK and has since been quoted over 500 times to express his privacy advocacy opinions in leading publications such as The Times, The Guardian, The Washington Post, CNet, and The Register to name a few. Ray has also been interviewed on the TV and the radio, including on The BBC and Russia Today to answer questions regarding privacy laws and surveillance tech.\nRay has written tech guides, reviews, blogs, news, and opinion pieces for BestVPN, ProPrivacy, Dell Tech Page One, StartPage, and Politics.co.uk \u2013 and he is now a happy member of the Comparitech family where he continues his crusade to increase privacy and internet freedom for people around the world.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/ray-walsh\/","@type":"Question","name":"Can I use a BlueStacks VPN on Mac?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"Yes. All of our recommended VPNs for BlueStacks have both Android and MacOS VPN apps. This means that you can choose to either install the VPN onto your Macbook to protect BlueStacks with the VPN on the host computer. Or, you can download the VPN app for Android directly onto BlueStacks from the Google Play Store and connect from the emulator itself.\u00a0\nRemember that by connecting to the VPN with BlueStacks, the rest of your computer will not be protected by the VPN connection. This creates a split tunneling experience and allows you to do anything in BlueStacks protected by the VPN; while anything you do on your Mac will still use the regular unprotected internet connection provided by your ISP.\nIf you want to, you can also connect to the VPN on both your Mac and your BlueStacks simultaneously. This will create a Double VPN connection for your BlueStacks in which your traffic is first tunneled securely to the VPN server selected in the Mac client, and then securely forwarded to the VPN server selected in the Android VPN client; before being directed to its final destination at the website or internet service you want to use.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Ray Walsh","description":"Ray Walsh is a digital privacy expert with over 6 years of experience writing about consumer privacy services including VPNs, password managers, secure email services, and encrypted cloud backups.\nRay graduated from the English department of Exeter University in the UK and has since been quoted over 500 times to express his privacy advocacy opinions in leading publications such as The Times, The Guardian, The Washington Post, CNet, and The Register to name a few. Ray has also been interviewed on the TV and the radio, including on The BBC and Russia Today to answer questions regarding privacy laws and surveillance tech.\nRay has written tech guides, reviews, blogs, news, and opinion pieces for BestVPN, ProPrivacy, Dell Tech Page One, StartPage, and Politics.co.uk \u2013 and he is now a happy member of the Comparitech family where he continues his crusade to increase privacy and internet freedom for people around the world.\n","url":"ht


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